THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY

THE BUILDING

 

Following an open competition among scores of the city's most prominent architects, the (at the time) relatively unknown firm of Carrère and Hastings was selected to design and construct the new library. The result, regarded as the apogee of Beaux-Arts design, was the largest marble structure ever attempted in the United States. The cornerstone was laid in May 1902 and the building was opened to the public on May 23, 1911. 

 

THE RESTORATION

 

​​In preparation for the centennial of the building, the Library commissioned a full exterior survey.  I was in charge of the team evaluating the exterior building sculptures. The facade has several important sculptures including Frederick MacMonnies' "Beauty" and George Grey Barnard's "Arts" and "History," on the south and north pediments, respectively.  Emergency restorative work was specified and performed.  My duties also included preparation of restoration specifications for the famed “Lions” by Edward Clark Potter.

© 2013 by The Painter​